Accused of Disorderly Conduct?

Disorderly Conduct Definition

Disorderly conduct is defined as behavior that disrupts the peace. This is a broad term that envelops unruly behavior such as using vulgar or obscene language in a public place, vagrancy, loitering, causing a crowd to gather in a public place, or annoying other passengers on public transportation. Typically a judge decides whether the offense is in fact disorderly conduct and a jury will decide if the person is guilty. Disorderly conduct in Illinois is described in statute and includes bomb threats, pulling a fire alarm when there is not a fire and knowingly filing a false police report.

Disorderly Conduct Illinois Law

According to Illinois Statute, disorderly conduct occurs when a person knowingly:

  • Does an act in such an unreasonable manner as to alarm or disturb another or breach the peace—Class C misdemeanor
  • Transmits a false fire alarm to the fire department—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a false bomb alarm—Class 3 felony
  • Transmits a threat of destruction of violence, death or bodily harm to a school building or persons at a school—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a knowingly false report of a criminal offense to a police officer—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a false report to a public safety agency without reasonable grounds—Class A misdemeanor, second or subsequent, Class 4 felony
  • Calls 911 with the purpose of making a knowingly false alarm complaint—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a false report to the Department of Children and Family Services—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a false report to the Department of Public Health—Class B misdemeanor
  • Transmits a false request for an ambulance—Class 4 felony
  • Transmits a false report about under Article II of “An Act in relation to victims of violence and abuse”—Class B misdemeanor
  • Enters the property of another for a lewd or unlawful purpose and looks into a window or other opening—Class A misdemeanor, third or subsequent, Class 4 felony
  • Harasses or intimidates an alleged debtor by telephone call—Business offense

Disorderly Conduct Punishment

A charge for disorderly conduct will have a different punishment depending on the circumstances of the offense. Disorderly conduct charges can vary from a Class C misdemeanor to a Class 3 felony. In addition to any other penalties, a disorderly conduct charge also has a punishment of:

  • 30-120 hours community service

A bomb threat can have an additional fine of $3,000 to $10,000 and require reimbursement of the cost of the response to the threat.

Business offense

  • A fine not to exceed $3,000

Class C misdemeanor

  • Up to 30 days in jail
  • Up to two years of probation
  • A fine of up to $1,500

Class B misdemeanor

  • Up to six months in jail
  • Up to two years of probation
  • A fine of up to $1,500

Class A misdemeanor

  • Up to one year in jail
  • Up to two years of probation (formal supervision)
  • A fine of up to $2,500

Class 4 felony

  • Possible imprisonment of 1-3 years
  • Fines of up to $25,000

Class 3 felony

  • Possible imprisonment of 2-5 years
  • Fines of up to $25,000

Disorderly Conduct Charges

If you face disorderly conduct charges, you need to hire a Criminal Defense Lawyer familiar with disorderly conduct charges. Chicago Criminal Defense Lawyers specialize in helping clients that are charged with a variety of criminal offenses. Dennis F. Dwyer is a Chicago Criminal Defense Attorney that is familiar with disorderly conduct charges. Call his office today to discuss your disorderly conduct charge.

Minor Traffic Offenses Add Up to Cause Major Problems
Internet Crime: A Growing Offense

Request Your Free Consultation

Your Name *
Your Email *
Tell Us About Your Case